Monday, August 7, 2017

Opinion: Ernst Zundel deserved agony, not a quiet exit

As historical footnotes go, one of my proudest contributions was the exposing of Ernst Zundel as a neo-Nazi.

From that point onward, the secret world of this notorious Toronto-based anti-Semite began to unravel, leading to years in court fighting extradition as a security risk, and finally his deportation to a German jail where he served time for inciting racial hatred and for being a Holocaust denier, a criminal offence in Germany.

It has been learned, through a posting by his estranged wife, that Zundel — odious to the core — died of a heart attack Saturday at age 78 at his home in Germany’s Black Forest where he lived after his release from prison in 2010 following five years of incarceration.

In the end, he had been deported from both the United States and Canada, and was wanted by no one.

Germany had no choice. Zundel was one of theirs.

It began for me in 1978 when a TV mini-series on the Holocaust saw the sudden appearance of Ernst Zundel being quoted in all the media as a legitimate and seemingly benign spokesman for a group called Concerned Parents of German Descent, who argued that the Second World War was long over, and that Germans were being tarnished yet again by the sins of their forefathers.

Who in hell was this Ernst Zundel?  (more...)

In the same vein:
Had Zundel's odious ideology died out, Bonokowski's and Warmington's admonishments would be unnecessary.  It is most unfortunate that a dark subculture of hate persists in Toronto to this day.

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